Quotes by Former United States Senator Henry Clay

Quotes by Former United States Senator Henry Clay

Find here the best quotes and Sayings by the popular Politician and American Layer, His words are mainly focus to inspire and motivate the people.

Quotes by Former United States Senator Henry Clay

  • Statistics are no substitute for judgment.
  • Peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must.
  • All legislation is founded upon the principle of mutual concession.
  • Honor and good faith and justice are equally due from this country toward the weak as toward the strong.
  • Of all the properties which belong to honorable men, not one is so highly prized as that of character.
  • The time will come when winter will ask what you were doing all summer.
  • How often are we forced to charge fortune with partiality towards the unjust!
  • The gentleman cannot have forgotten his own sentiment, uttered even on the floor of this House, Peaceably if we can, forcibly if we must.
  • The imposition of taxes has its limits. There is a maximum which cannot be transcended. Suppose the citizen to be taxed by the general government to the utmost extent of his ability, or a thing as much as it can possibly bear, and the state imposes a tax at the same time, which authority is to take it?
  • By competition the total amount of supply is increased, and by increase of the supply a competition in the sale ensues, and this enables the consumer to buy at lower rates. Of all human powers operating on the affairs of mankind, none is greater than that of competition.
  • The time will come when winter will ask you what you were doing all summer.
  • All legislation, all government, all society is founded upon the principle of mutual concession, politeness, comity, courtesy; upon these everything is based…Let him who elevates himself above humanity, above its weaknesses, its infirmities, its wants, its necessities, say, if he pleases, I will never compromise; but let no one who is not above the frailties of our common nature disdain compromises.
  • Impart additional strength to our happy Union.?Diversified as are the interests of its various parts, how admirably do they harmonize and blend together!?We have only to make a proper use of the bounties spread before us, to render us prosperous and powerful.
  • Let him who elevates himself above humanity . . . say, if he pleases, “I will never compromise”; but let no one who is not above the frailties of our common nature disdain compromise.
  • We have had good and bad Presidents, and it is a consoling reflection that the American Nation possesses such elements of prosperity that the bad Presidents cannot destroy it, and have been able to do no more than slightly to retard the public’s advancement.
  • Whether we assert our rights by sea, or attempt their maintenance by land whithersoever we turn ourselves, this phantom incessantly pursues us. Already has it had too much influence on the councils of the nation.
  • The colors that float from the masthead should be the credentials of our seamen. There is no safety to us, and the gentlemen have shown it, but in the rule that all who sail under the flag (not being enemies) are protected by the flag.
  • In a scheme of policy which is devised for a nation, we should not limit our views to its operation during a single year, or even for a short term of years. We should look at its operation for a considerable time, and in war as well as in peace.
  • The great advantage of our system of government over all others, is, that we have a written constitution, defining its limits, and prescribing its authorities; and that, however, for a time, faction may convulse the nation, and passion and party prejudice sway its functionaries, the season of reflection will recur, when calmly retracing their deeds, all aberrations from fundamental principle will be corrected.

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